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The International Norm

Robert Wilson

Globalization is featured in almost every facet of my daily life. At this moment, I am sitting on a Swedish futon and typing on a Japanese computer. The futon, computer and the clothes I’m wearing were all manufactured in China. I drove home from work in a Japanese car, and filled her up with Russian/UAE gas. I don’t think I interact with many solely American designed and manufactured products on a daily basis. According to Thomas Friedman’s Three era’s of Globalization, I am a product of German globalization in America during the first era of globalization.

The impact that globalization has had on my family is the fluidity of travel it provides. My older brother works in England, and has lived there for close to 5 years now. He managed to secure a lucrative high paying position, but he had to move his family across the Atlantic. My Aunt recently married a British man and she now lives in both England and the U.S. Just two weeks ago I traveled to Paris, France; Roseto, Italy; and Lauterbrunnen, Switzerland on a two week tour. None of the previous examples would have been possible had there not been a trend toward globalization in the recent decades.

Globalization has been a net positive for the U.S consumers. Consumers and companies have had access to cheaper products and services because of the global competition. Many affordable products are now available in quantities that the average consumer can purchase. Globalization has also afforded the average U.S consumer with travel opportunities. Outsourcing positions has also become a net positive for businesses, according to Tholons globalization Index the U.S outsourcing market itself is valued at 88.9 billion dollars. The U.S has benefited from globalization due to cheaper goods, services and travel.

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