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Globalization: A Whole New (Old) World

Erhan Sarayli

 

Globalization, while a newer term, is actually an older practice that has been seen throughout the world. The process itself is quite fragile, with certain social, political, economic, etc. factors having major effects on the extent of globalization. As the word emanates, the phrase essentially refers to the act of different entities, whether individuals, organizations, corporations, and so on, collaborating and cooperating in a cohesive way to encourage the spread of ideals, products, and services. And as noted from the lecture slides, our working definition of “globalization” fits well to this, being noted as the process of “increasing friction-less flow of capital, labor, information, goods and services, without regard to national boundaries”.

On a more personal note, globalization has had quite a profound effect on my near and extended family. An ideal example of this is during World War II, my grandfather was taken from his hometown island village off the coast of the Mediterranean, to Munich, Germany to work at the Spaten Beer factory while many of the German men were fighting the war. On a less direct note, globalization has affected my family through the way in which my father’s profession was affected. My dad works in the healthcare supply-chain industry, and a number of his daily and weekly goals and tasks are impacted by globalization, as many of the supplies that he has to work with come from foreign corporations.

When tasked with answering the question of whether globalization has been good for the United States or not, the short answer: yes. Within the past 200 years, the reason for the US being considered a super power globally is due to the nation’s integrity with staying up to pace with globalization. A main field where the US succeeded here is/was the defense and weapons industries.

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